Home > Places of Interest > The Archaeological Site: Oxyrhynchus, Egypt

The Archaeological Site: Oxyrhynchus, Egypt

By: Grahame Johnston - Updated: 7 Nov 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Oxyrhynchus Egypt Grammatological

The archaeological site of Oxyrhynchus in Egypt is highly regarded as the most important grammatological location discovered in history. The site has yielded an enormous collection of papyri dating from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods that help explain early Egyptian history and corroborate ancient European and Eastern philosophies.

Etymology of a Funny Name

The name Oxyrhynchus is most definitely an unusual one and its etymology is even more interesting. The village of Oxyrhynchus was named after a Nile River fish. The word is Greek and means ‘sharp nosed’. This sharp-snouted fish is important in Egypt’s mythology as the one that bit the penis of Osiris the Egyptian god of life, death, and fertility.

Oxyrhynchus or el-Bahnasa, its modern Arab Egyptian name, lies 100 miles south of Cairo and west of the Nile River. Egypt was ceding itself from the Ottoman to the British Empire in 1882, permitting British archaeologists to excavate the country by systematic study. Bernard Grenfell, a fellow of Queen’s College, Oxford, first began excavating the site in 1896.

Nothing of Interest

The site, at first, appeared uninteresting with mounds of rubbish littering the ground. However, the unique climatic conditions had preserved an unequalled archive of written documents of the ancient world and Grenfell and his team were about to discover a torrent of papyri texts that literally swamped the academic world like a Nile flood.

Since Grenfell’s discovery, archaeologists have sifted through the Oxyrhynchus’ sand in search of lost masterpieces from antiquity. In particular, Grenfell and his colleague, Arthur Hunt, were anxious to unearth Classical period texts and the same passion and hope has inspired hundreds of archaeologists since to be similarly inspired.

A Staggering Collection

It is universally agreed that more than 70 percent of all of the world’s literary papyri comes from the Oxyrhynchus site. This staggering collection is why it is so important.

Even so, less than 10 percent of the yield is literary texts. The remaining 90 percent of the papyri are public and private documents such as registers, rules, commands, religious writings, census papers, tax returns, court petitions, wills, accounts, sales documents, lease contracts, stock inventories, and personal letters.

Several ‘lost’ plays were discovered including ‘Ichneutae’ by Sophocles, a large selection of plays by the Hellenistic comedian, Menander, and poems by Pindar. Among the thousands of fragments and manuscripts were two unknown Christian works titled ‘Gospel of Thomas’ and ‘Gospel According to the Hebrews’. Neither is regarded as canonical.

Sifting the Sand

Apart from the war years Grenfell and Hunt devoted every digging season to the site at Oxyrhynchus. Hundreds of Egyptian labourers were employed during the cooler winter months to excavate the ‘rubbish mounds’.

Over the centuries the discarded papyri had become mixed with earth in layered form. Excavators had to carefully dig into the hardened ground and lift the tightly packed layers in lumps.

Grenfell and Hunt supervised the sifting of the layered dirt and cleaning of the remaining papyri. It was then packaged and shipped back to England where the two archaeologists would analyse their finds over the summer months.

Oxyrhynchus Today

The archaeological site is still of extreme interest today and excavation continues as it has for more than one hundred years. More than 100,000 fragments of papyri are archived with photos and indexing in the Sackler Library in Oxford, England. This is the largest collection of classical manuscripts in the world with about 2,000 pieces being glass mounted on display and the remaining fragments in over 800 archival boxes.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • mary
    Re: Being Aware of Fake Archaeological Artefacts
    I have inca pottery I know is authentic and want to sell it. Where can I take it for some sort of…
    4 June 2018
  • Arornao
    Re: Academic Qualifications to Be An Archaeologist
    Sir/ mam Im studying BA prog 2nd yr in du My descipline subject is history And i want to be an archeologist…
    3 June 2018
  • ardhu
    Re: Academic Qualifications to Be An Archaeologist
    sir/madam iam a student of first year history honours i want to become archeaologist what can i do...I dont…
    28 May 2018
  • Debbie Floyd
    Re: Pottery Experts
    I purchased a primitive looking dog effigy vessel it looks like red clay but I don’t know if it’s authentic or a reproduction? Could someone please…
    27 May 2018
  • Jayalath kulasinghe
    Re: Types of Archaeology
    My name is jayalath kulasinghe from Sri Lanka working as an exploration officer in department of archaeology Colombo 07. Since I was working…
    24 May 2018
  • ArchaeologyExpert
    Re: Dating Techniques In Archaeology
    MAL - Your Question:I have a small vase. 3 inches high round ay the bottom and tubular at the top with a small lip around the…
    21 May 2018
  • MAL
    Re: Dating Techniques In Archaeology
    I have a small vase. 3 inches high round ay the bottom and tubular at the top with a small lip around the top. It’s bluish…
    18 May 2018
  • Kaitlyn
    Re: Pottery Experts
    I found a peice of pottery on the beach and I can't find out how old it is but it does have some symbols which have been stamped in. So it's got…
    10 May 2018
  • Rohit
    Re: Pottery Experts
    I need some advice on a pottery item, so far i know this is a clay pot and older then 150 years (before 1850).
    9 May 2018
  • Lyne
    Re: Types of Archaeological Data
    What are the importance of tangible and intangible data in archaeology
    2 May 2018
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the ArchaeologyExpert website. Please read our Disclaimer.